Couverture médiatique

Couverture médiatique

L’ACCVM profite de sa bonne image auprès des médias pour rappeler les difficultés que connaissent les petites sociétés de courtage et sociétés de courtage indépendantes au Canada et orienter les débats sur ce sujet. Voici des commentaires récents de l’ACCVM dans les médias consacrés uniquement aux petites sociétés de courtage et sociétés de courtage indépendantes: 


Winnipeg Free Press
– 14 avril 2017 –
A-Spiring to make history

Passages choisis

• Ian Russell, CEO of the Investment Industry Association of Canada (IIAC), said over the past eight years, about 30 independent firms across the country have disappeared.

• “Banks have become more dominant. They have grown substantially,” Russell said. “And there is a unique appeal to independents.”

• Russell cited several independents, including Richardson GMP, Canaccord Genuity and Raymond James, among others.

• “They are really very effective competitors in the business,” Russell said. “There is plenty of evidence to show small firms can be very successful in this market and it’s very gratifying to see someone else step up to the plate.”


Investment Executive
– 1er mars 2017 –
Adding advisors

Passages choisis

• Edward Jones is on a mission to add 1,000 financial advisors to its ranks by the end of 2020—and that’s just the starting point for the brokerage firm’s aggressive expansion strategy.

• That 2020 deadline will be followed by another push to recruit an additional 1,500 advisors.

• Edward Jones’ determination to grow at this pace demonstrates that the firm is upbeat about the Canadian market and has seen success here, says Ian Russell, president and CEO of the Investment Industry Association of Canada in Toronto.

• The firm has demonstrated an understanding of the need for wealth-management services in Canada, says Russell: “[That need] is really a product of the aging demographic and the demand for more services, [such as] financial planning, retirement advice, estate planning and specialized tax advice.”

• Russell agrees that Edward Jones has an opportunity to expand its client base, especially in the mass-affluent market, which is being affected by shifts in the financial services sector.

• Financial services firms are facing higher costs and some are raising the minimum account thresholds, leaving clients with lower levels of assets to receive commoditized services, he says: “[Edward Jones] sees investors who are looking for a more personalized service and personalized wealth management and they don’t have huge amounts of money.”


Advisor.ca
– 30 janvier 2017 –
Investment firm closures in Canada to rise, survey says

Passages choisis

• 5 tips for competing as a small, independent dealer.

• The Investment Industry Association of Canada says 36 retail firms have resigned from IIROC since 2011, some through mergers and acquisitions, and an estimated 30 more retail boutiques are under earnings stress.

• Technological disruption and the increasing costs of regulatory compliance have created a new ballgame for smaller dealers as big firms, including the banks, expand through acquisitions and use their scale to compete on costs and pricing.


Financial Post
– 6 janvier 2017 –
Investment firm closures in Canada to rise, survey says

Passages choisis

• The number of securities firms operating in Canada is likely to shrink further amid competition and escalating costs from technology and regulations, according to a survey from the country’s main industry group.

• But the industry’s own expectation is that the recent shift still won’t be enough to benefit all dealers – particularly the smallest of the bunch.

• “Roughly one-quarter of the small firms in the investment industry will continue to struggle from difficult competitive pressures and the steady escalation in fixed costs from technology and regulatory change,” IIAC chief executive officer Ian Russell said in a speech Thursday in Toronto.


The Globe and Mail
– 6 janvier 2017 –
Bay Street’s smallest dealers still under threat despite sunnier outlook

Passages choisis

• With commodity prices rebounding and stock markets popping since the U.S. election, Bay Street is finally feeling more optimistic.

• But the industry’s own expectation is that the recent shift still won’t be enough to benefit all dealers – particularly the smallest of the bunch.

• “Even with greater optimism about the coming years’ prospects, we remain concerned that many small firms will not benefit much from the improving outlook,” IIAC head Ian Russell said in a speech to the Empire Club of Canada on Thursday.

• However, IIAC stressed that some smaller dealers have found a way to stay competitive. “We also observe that a core group of smaller firms, a critical mass of some 70 to 80 firms, have built strategic niche businesses, cut operating costs to the bone and adapted technology to compete effectively and compensate for lack of scale,” Mr. Russell said.


Investment Executive
– 5 janvier 2017 –
Building a strategic, niche business is critical for securities dealers

Passages choisis

• Cutting operating costs and adapting technology to compete effectively and compensate for lack of scale are also key traits of successful firms, says Ian Russell in a speech


Advisor.ca
– 5 janvier 2017 –
Another year of challenges, or are things looking up?

Passages choisis

• Luckily, according to the IIAC’s 2016 CEO survey, there may be better times ahead. The survey, which was conducted in November, polled 132 investment dealer member firms, and those execs were positive about market performance in the near term.

• Overall, Russell says the CEO survey reveals respondents are more optimistic about economic drivers and less worried about external, global shocks.

• That said, industry changes remain a frontline concern: CEOs expect their revenues to rise faster in 2017, but are watching for more regulatory pressure, increased competition from technology disruptors like robos, and demographics challenges.


Wealth Professional
– 18 novembre 2016 –
Cost containment a priority for Canadian wealth managers

Passages choisis

• As Canadian wealth firms face increasing regulation and pressure to compete through technology adoption, cost minimization has become a major concern, according to IIAC president Ian C.W. Russell.

• Efforts to minimize expenses in other ways have successfully contained growth of operational costs in 2011-2015 at 2% per year. Some technology investments have resulted in improved efficiencies in operation and rule compliance.

• Firms have also attempted to reduce staff, but could only cut so much given the need for sales staff and compliance personnel among many shops.


Investment Executive
– 17 novembre 2016 –
Large securities dealers drive growth in investment industry profits

Passages choisis

• Canada’s retail securities industry has proven to be surprisingly profitable over the past several years, with larger firms generally outperforming their smaller competitors.

• As a result, small and mid-sized firms will have to find ways to boost revenue and cut costs, including revising their advisor payouts, if they hope to compete, according to the Investment Industry Association of Canada (IIAC).

• [T]he performance of the wealth-management business has been uneven, with the large firms (both the integrated firms and the independents) benefiting from their superior scale, cost control and investment in technology whereas, some of the smaller firms have struggled, Russell says.


Advisor.ca
– 17 novembre 2016 –
In the advisory world, size matters

Passages choisis

• On average, retail revenue rose about 6% annually from 2011 to 2015, outstripping annual operation cost increases, which are only about 2% per year, says Ian Russell, president and CEO of the Investment Industry Association of Canada, in an industry letter.

• Large integrated firms do better, because they can capitalize on scale to spread increased fixed costs over production. Among independent retail firms, profitability varies, with principal-agent models posting good earnings and smaller retailers proving unprofitable the last five years.

• He says small firms that do well have made “herculean efforts” to control costs, as evident in that small 2% annual rate of cost increases, despite substantial outlays for tech and compliance.

• Still, those costs are substantial, and put downward pressure on advisor payout.

• “There may be further attrition among small and mid-sized firms in the investment dealer retail business in coming years, but the many firms that survive will be effective and profitable purveyors of wealth management advisory services, with their clients the big winners,” concludes Russell.


Wealth Professional
– 17 novembre 2016 –
Wealth industry sees overall profit, but some firms struggle

Passages choisis

• Headwinds faced by the Canadian wealth management sector have not prevented its overall profitability, though they are affecting some segments, according to IIAC President Ian C.W. Russell.

• The sector may have shown solid performance, but it has not been even across firms. The retail business of integrated firms has done well due to their scale, rapid technology adoption, and prudent cost management.

• However, while large independent retail firms have managed to achieve fairly good earnings, small and mid-sized firms have been unprofitable. “The poor performance of these smaller retail franchises suggests difficulties in containing costs and growing revenue,” Russell said.

• “Regulators must slow the pace of future reform to bring a proper cost-benefit assessment to the rule-making process, avoiding unnecessary compliance costs and limiting unintended consequences,” Russell said, calling for efforts to contain or rationalize compliance costs.


Advisor.ca
– 11 novembre 2016 –
No sale for Richardson GMP: GMP Capital

Passages choisis

• Ian Russell, head of the Investment Industry Association of Canada, told Advisor.ca in an interview before the announcement that a bank purchase of RGMP would have meant losing “a unique firm, a really good franchise.”

• He added that “the bigger firms are going after the high-producing, high-performing brokers to build their business, and investing in their technology. That’s a good strategy.”


BNN
– 31 octobre 2016 –
What makes Richardson GMP an attractive takeover target?

Passages choisis

• BNN speaks with Ian Russell of the Investment Industry Association of Canada about TD’s reported bid for Richardson GMP and what’s driving consolidation in the space.


Advisor.ca
– 20 octobre 2016 –
‘Death by a thousand cuts’ for independent IIROC firms?

Passages choisis :

• The number of firms registered to trade securities has continued to fall, reaching 167 this month. And one industry group predicts an additional decline of 50 more investment houses over the next few years.

• “That number’s probably going to go down by another 50 firms in the next two [to three] years,” says Ian Russell, head of Investment Industry Association of Canada, noting that small houses of 10 to 15 people will be most affected.

• Lower commodities and resources prices have affected many boutique firms at the same time as they’re under higher regulatory and technology cost pressures.


Advisor.ca
– 17 octobre 2016 –
What’s in store for independent advisors?

Passage choisi :

• In Canada, the IIAC says 46 investment firms have closed or been taken over since 2012, which represents about a quarter of the industry.


Canadian Business
– 13 octobre 2016 –
Why fees will go up

Passages choisis :

• Many of the small dealers of yore would sell speculative offerings [Ian Russell, IIAC President and CEO] says.

• “Canadians are focusing less on risky investments and more on discretionary managed business,” such as financial and estate planning, he says.

• “As people age, you see this shift away from speculative investments and this move to larger firms that offer a wider array of services.”


Vancouver Sun
– 28 septembre 2016 –
Investment Industry Association of Canada’s Vancouver members hit by low commodity prices

Passages choisis :

• Almost all IIAC’s Vancouver-based members are small and mid-sized dealers whose business has been significantly impacted by the recent collapse of the commodity markets, [IIAC President and CEO Ian] Russell said.

• Those firms, Russell said last week, “have struggled, really, for five consecutive years … First and foremost, economics has played a role —there’s no question, it’s a venture market that’s heavily weighted to commodities.”

• For years, the “traditional model,” Russell said, would see many retail investors put 90 per cent of their investment with a big bank-owned investment firm, and then the final 10 per cent — their “spec money” — with a specialized IIAC dealer investing in small-cap stocks. But as investors age, he said, their tolerance for risk generally decreases, leaving less and less “retail money” for IIAC member dealers to handle.


Financial Post
– 9 septembre 2016 –
‘They’re not safe’: Smaller firms, financial institutions becoming more vulnerable to cyber attacks

Passages choisis :

• The head of the Investment Industry Association of Canada raised the alarm about cyber crime last year, acknowledging that many Bay Street firms weren’t as prepared as they should be.

• “Our focus, really, is making sure our small and medium sized (dealers) are secure,” says Susan Copland, managing director of the IIAC. “Because a breach at one firm affects everybody, not just through reputation but through the interconnections of the system.”


Business in Vancouver
– 23 août 2016 –
Regulations, resource markets squeeze B.C. firms

Passages choisis :

• The long-term weakness of the resource market and an increase in industry regulation are the two biggest concerns facing investment firms in British Columbia, according to the Investment Industry Association of Canada (IIAC).

• Less activity and a poor rate of return on the price of various resources has had a significant impact on smaller issuers in particular. The same issuers are also more likely to struggle to comply with new investment industry regulations that are costly for smaller players to adopt.

• “The regulatory burden disproportionally hits the smaller firms,” said Susan Copland, the IIAC’s Vancouver-based managing director. “We’ve seen a number of smaller brokerage firms in the west, particularly in Vancouver, disappear.”


Financial Post
– 5 août 2016 –
Securities’ industry mergers continue as GMP Capital buys ‘call option’ on return to better energy days

Passages choisis :

• [T]he purchase by GMP Capital of Calgary-based FirstEnergy will bring together two largely institutional-focused firms.

• That sector, as numbers produced by the Investment Industry Association of Canada reveal, has not been doing that well, in large part because of the prolonged decline in the commodities and natural resources business.

• • The slowdown in investment banking activity, combined with the bank-owned dealers keeping a higher percentage of the underwriting liability and the hyper-competitive equity-trading environment, have added to the slim pickings for the independents.


The Globe and Mail
– 29 juillet 2016 –
Big banks, small dealers and the growing underwriting divide

Passages choisis :

• The Investment Industry Association of Canada (IIAC), an industry advocacy group for the independent dealers, noted the inexorable rise of the integrated (bank-owned) dealers, in a letter released Thursday.

• The share of new equity issuance in 2015 by bank-owned dealers was 73 per cent, according to IIAC. Five years ago, it was running at under 60 per cent. Independents saw their share fall to just under 27 per cent from 41 per cent in the same period.

• IIAC CEO Ian Russell put the multiyear shift down to the “greater incidence of large corporate financings” and “successful penetration by the integrated firms into the mid-cap underwriting market.

• Encouragingly for the boutiques, IIAC points out that they are doing many things right – including aggressively cutting costs, slimming operations where appropriate and honing in on areas where they have a competitive edge, including “effective research on mid-cap companies” and “strong institutional and corporate relationships.”


Advisor.ca
– 28 juillet 2016 –
Are smaller investors getting the boot?

Passages choisis :

• Over the last few years, “wealth-management business expenses have escalated dramatically for both small and large investment dealers,” says Ian Russell, president and CEO of the IIAC, in his latest letter.

• And, these costs will largely be passed on to consumers via higher commissions, fees and charges, he adds, noting, “The higher-end client will pay more for customized and value-added products and services, [while] the small investor will pay higher charges and face more limited advice options.”


Financial Post
– 28 mai 2016 –
The mysterious decline of the Canadian public company

Passages choisis :

• [T]the incredible shrinking equity market has massive implications for entrepreneurs used to tapping public equity, as well as for the securities lawyers, investment bankers, accountants and stock exchanges who depend on serving that market.

• No fewer than 50 boutique investment firms — some 25 per cent of the market — have disappeared, merged or changed their business models over the past three years, according to the Investment Industry Association of Canada.

• “That’s a big issue for Canada because our market is just dominated by small issuers,” said Bryce Tingle, who holds the N. Murray Edwards Chair in business law at the University of Calgary.


Bloomberg
– 26 mai 2016 –
Raymond James Buys Canada’s MacDougall MacDougall & MacTier

Passages choisis :

• “It’s a good merger,” Ian Russell, CEO of the Investment Industry Association of Canada, said Thursday in an interview. “You’ve just created a very strong, independent firm that will add significant competitive pressures and choice into the market.”


Investment Executive
– 1er mai 2016 –
Raising the bar on “best execution”

Passages choisis :

• IIAC’s comment argues that best execution data is not the sort of disclosure that most retail investors want or need. Adding this routing and execution data on top of the expanded disclosure about cost and performance mandated under the second phase of the client relationship model is likely to just burden many clients with unwanted information, the IIAC comment states.

• Moreover, the IIAC comment raises concerns that the proposed rules will be too costly for smaller, independent firms that don’t have the resources to analyze detailed trade execution data closely.

• Many smaller firms are struggling already in the current market environment. The IIAC comment warns that “imposing another expensive and time-consuming regulatory requirement on these dealers” may help to push some of these firms out of business.


Master Metals Blog
– 29 mars 2016 –
#Canada: number resource-focused #brokerages Shrinks again, from @MiningMavenGwen

Passages choisis :

• News a few days ago that PI Financial is acquiring Wolverton Securities and Global Securities. In other words, three of the few remaining independent Vancouver-based dealers are becoming one, shortening what in the last few years has become a short list of small, resource-focused brokerage shops.

• Declining commodity prices did not only hurt miners and explorers: the small banks that advised their transactions, led their financings, and told their stories also took a beating.

• In fact, the Investment Industry Association of Canada says 50 small houses, representing a quarter of the banks in the business, have either folded or been acquired in the last three years.


Financial Post
– 22 mars 2016 –
PI Financial acquires two independent dealers as consolidation heats up in brokerage business

Passages choisis :

• PI’s acquisition plans were announced the same day the Investment Industry Association of Canada (IIAC) released it’s presidential letter and the brokerage industry’s financial performance for 2015.

• In the letter, Ian Russell referred to the challenges faced by the retail firms, particularly the client relationship model (CRM) and “rising regulatory costs,” adding that the country “can ill-afford the loss of the boutique sector.”

• Russell said that 10 per cent hike in operating costs for the self-clearing retail boutiques occurred because the firms hired “compliance specialists and consultants and (adopted) the necessary technology and systems to comply with the new CRM rule framework.”

• Russell also requested that the Ontario Securities Commission undertake a cost-benefit analysis of plans to further reform the client-advisor relationship and create a “best interest” standard.


Investment Executive
– 21 mars 2016 –
• Securities firms battered in 2015: IIAC

Passages choisis :

• Rising regulatory costs are the main reason for the increase in operating expenses at retail firms.

• The IIAC acknowledges that these reforms have improved industry transparency and conduct standards, but it calls on securities regulators to carry out cost-benefit analysis before launching any major new rule proposals, such as the possible introduction of a proposed “best interest” duty on financial advisors.

• Indeed, the IIAC suggests that regulators carry out a cost-benefit analysis even before launching any consultations on further reforms, “to confirm that the benefits of these reforms — incremental to the comprehensive CRM rule framework — justify the additional costs imposed on registered firms and advisors, and on clients,” the Russell letter says.


Advisor.ca
– 21 mars 2016 –
Will the carnage end for boutique firms?

Passage choisi :

• In his latest industry letter, Ian Russell, president and CEO of the Investment Industry Association of Canada (IIAC), explains just how bad it’s been, and why he’s still optimistic the boutiques’ fortunes could turn around.


Canadian Business
– 14 mars 2016 –
Thomas Caldwell on the decline of traditional stock brokerages

Passages choisis :

• Banks have taken over most of the large investment dealers. As for “boutique” firms, 50 have either merged or folded in just the past four years, according to the Investment Industry Association of Canada.

• “I wouldn’t go into this industry now,” laments the founder of Caldwell Securities, citing shrinking margins and stifling regulation.


Soberlook.com
– 20 février 2016 –
Canada`s Changing Financial Landscape, Part 1: the Securities Industry

Passages choisis :

• A series of radical changes has hit the industry simultaneously.

• Compliance and regulatory changes: Ian Russell the President of the Investment Industry Association of Canada (IIAC), estimates these costs have risen by 7% in 2015, on top of a 6% rise in 2014. He believes “the relentless rise in operating costs will squeeze profitably” in 2016.

• The industry features many small independent, boutique -size firms that no longer can compete for capital; the bulk of the firms are capitalized at $10 million or less, precluding them from participating in larger financing deals. Russell expects a further consolidation as firms either merge and/or shut down.


Insurance and Investment Journal
– 9 février 2016 –
Securities industry faces increasing consolidation

Passages choisis :

• The securities industry should expect 2016 to see more consolidation and greater regulation as well as bring a larger impact on their businesses caused by demographics, said the president and CEO of the Investment Industry Association of Canada (IIAC).

• In releasing the IIAC’s annual investment outlook at the Empire Club of Canada in Toronto in early January, Ian Russell said the survey follows “another mediocre year” for the Canadian economy.

• The CEOs said they expected costs to increase about 6.8% in 2015, compared to a 6.1% rise in 2014. The biggest culprit was regulation and the increased compliance costs, consulting, technology and staff needed to meet both CRM rules and FATCA reporting, said Russell.

• “So what does this relentless cost escalation mean? It means that most executives expect an even greater ramp up in the regulatory burden [over the] next year,” said Russell.


The Globe and Mail
– 7 février 2016 –
Bay Street Blues

Passages choisis :

• Today, of the 100 or so independent dealers left in Canada, 50 post annual revenue of $5-million or less – “a magnitude suggesting insufficient scale to operate under existing conditions,” according to Investment Industry Association of Canada CEO Ian Russell.

• In other words, more shutdowns are inevitable.

• “Independents that are doing well are well managed, have managed their costs well, and are firms that have some diversification on the revenue front,” says IIAC’s Mr. Russell.

• Cormark, FirstEnergy, Peters & Co., Mackie Research, Haywood Securities – it isn’t to say those firms haven’t had their share of difficulty. But they’re doing okay.”


Investment Executive
– 1er février 2016 –
Markets: Nothing ventured

Passages choisis :

• The perception of the TSXV, one issuer noted, is that “it’s full of resources companies that are poorly capitalized.”

• Still, other market players cite the ever-growing dominance of the bank-owned dealers as a reason for eroding retail participation.

• According to the IIAC, 34 investment dealers have vanished over the past three years, either through consolidation, closing up shop or shifting to the exempt market.

• As these firms recede, their clients are left in the hands of the larger, integrated firms – particularly the big bank-owned dealers – and there’s a sense within the venture community that investment advisors at these firms increasingly are unable to put their clients into speculative stocks.


Insurance and Investment Journal
– 20 janvier 2016 –
Les sociétés spécialisées de courtage en valeurs mobilières sont sous pression (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Dans sa toute dernière lettre aux membres, Ian Russell, président de l’Association canadienne des courtiers en valeurs mobilières (ACCVM), suggère que les sociétés spécialisées de courtage en valeurs mobilières sont « sous pression ».

• Il souligne que les conditions économiques difficiles et « l’érosion implacable des marges d’exploitation » ont forcé plusieurs sociétés de détail à fermer leurs portes.

• Il attribue une partie de la responsabilité au nouveau modèle de relation client conseiller (MRCC) qui a imposé de nouvelles exigences réglementaires auxquelles les petites sociétés n’ont pas les ressources pour se conformer.


The Globe and Mail
– 14 janvier 2016 –
La restructuration en profondeur de GMP touche des cadres supérieurs au Canada (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• L’Association canadienne des courtiers en valeurs mobilières a récemment révélé que 25 % des sociétés de courtage en valeurs mobilières – pour la plupart des petites sociétés – ont mis fin à leurs activités ou se sont restructurées au cours des trois dernières années à cause de la conjoncture économique et de l’augmentation des coûts réglementaires.


Bloomberg
– 13 janvier 2016 –
GMP procédera à des mises à pied et mettra fin à ses activités au R.-U. et en Australie à cause de l’effondrement des cours des matières premières (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• D’autres petites sociétés dont les activités sur les marchés des capitaux dépendent des secteurs des mines, du pétrole et du gaz ont disparu.

• Au cours des quatre dernières années, 46 sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières ont fermé leurs portes ou ont été rachetées, selon l’Association canadienne des courtiers en valeurs mobilières.


Investor Intel
– 13 janvier 2016 –
La responsabilité de la Bourse de Toronto dans le déclin de Bay Street (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Le secteur lui-même s’attend à la poursuite des regroupements cette année. Le sondage de décembre 2015 mené par l’Association canadienne des courtiers en valeurs mobilières indique qu’environ 51 % des chefs de la direction de sociétés de courtage en valeurs mobilières s’attendent à une augmentation des dépenses en technologie en 2016 à cause principalement des coûts de conformité plus élevés et du coût de la technologie elle même.

• Selon le sondage, l’aggravation du ralentissement économique et l’augmentation de ces coûts favoriseront d’autres regroupements de sociétés de courtage en 2016.

• Les mêmes constatations ont été effectuées dans le discours prononcé au début de janvier de cette année par M. Ian Russell, président et chef de la direction de l’ACCVM.

• M. Russell a souligné que plus de 50 sociétés spécialisées, ou environ 25 % du secteur, ont mis fin à leurs activités dans le secteur au cours des trois dernières années. Ce sont des statistiques stupéfiantes.


Advisor.ca
– 13 janvier 2016 –
Voici comment sauver la Bourse de croissance TSX, selon l’ACCVM (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Les sociétés de courtages spécialisées sont sous pression à cause de l’augmentation sans précédent des frais d’exploitation au cours des quelques dernières années.

• Ces difficultés des petites sociétés spécialisées ont coïncidé avec l’effondrement du marché public de capital de risque, a déclaré Ian Russell, président et chef de la direction de l’Association canadienne des courtiers en valeurs mobilières (ACCVM), dans sa dernière lettre sur le secteur.


Finance et Investissement
– 12 janvier 2016 –
La consolidation va se poursuivre en 2016, selon un sondage de l’ACCVM

Passages choisis :

• Quarante-huit pour cent des chefs de la direction des sociétés de courtage canadiennes pensent que la consolidation de poursuivra en 2016, due à une hausse croissante des frais d’exploitation.


Conseiller.ca
– 12 janvier 2016 –
L’ACCVM s’attend à une année 2016 difficile

Passages choisis :

• En plus du pessimisme ambiant, elle montre que ces responsables anticipent une croissance des frais d’exploitation au cours des 12 prochains mois, ce qui contribuera à la poursuite des fusions dans le secteur.


The Globe and Mail
– 6 janvier 2016 –
Les sociétés de courtage s’attendent à d’autres regroupements (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Les dirigeants des sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières s’attendent à ce que la mauvaise conjoncture économique et l’augmentation des coûts favorisent d’autres regroupements dans le secteur cette année, selon un sondage de l’Association canadienne des courtiers en valeurs mobilières.

• Environ la moitié des chefs de la direction qui ont participé au sondage s’attendent à ce que les dépenses en technologie augmentent plus rapidement cette année qu’en 2015, à cause principalement de l’augmentation des coûts de conformité et de la technologie, a déclaré l’ACCVM.

• On estime que ces coûts ont augmenté de 7 % en 2015, ce qui est supérieur à l’augmentation de 6 % en 2014.


Financial Post
– 6 janvier 2016 –
– 6 janvier 2016 – Des temps difficiles et l’augmentation des coûts ont fait disparaître 25 % des petites sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières, selon l’ACCVM (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• La restructuration et les regroupements dans le contexte d’une conjoncture économique difficile et d’une hausse des coûts réglementaires ont provoqué la disparition ou la restructuration de pas moins de 25 % des sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières au cours des trois dernières années, a déclaré Ian Russell, chef de la direction de l’Association canadienne des courtiers en valeurs mobilières.


Financialpost.com
– 6 janvier 2016 –
Cinq choses que vous devriez savoir avant de commencer votre journée de travail le 6 janvier (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Des temps difficiles pour les petites sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières, selon l’ACCVM.

• Plus de 50 sociétés spécialisées ont disparu et certaines d’entre elles se sont restructurées pour exercer leurs activités seulement sur le marché dispensé canadien qui est moins contraignant et moins coûteux, a déclaré M. Russell à Toronto.

• D’autres sociétés de petite et moyenne tailles ont carrément fermé leurs portes ou ont fusionné, rapporte Barbara Shecter.

• Malgré les regroupements en cours, on s’attend à un « recul important » au cours des quelques prochaines années, a déclaré M. Russell, à la lumière des résultats du récent sondage mené par l’ACCVM auprès des chefs de la direction des 144 sociétés de courtage en valeurs mobilières membres de l’association.


Bloomberg
– 5 janvier 2016 –
Les sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières s’attendent à d’autres regroupements en 2016 (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Les dirigeants des sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières s’attendent à ce que la mauvaise conjoncture économique et l’augmentation des coûts favorisent d’autres regroupements dans le secteur cette année, selon un sondage de l’Association canadienne des courtiers en valeurs mobilières.


Investment Executive
– 5 janvier 2016 –
Les chefs de la direction des sociétés de courtage en valeurs mobilières s’attendent à d’autres regroupements en 2016 (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Avec plus de 50 sociétés spécialisées institutionnelles et de détail qui ont mis fin à leurs activités dans le secteur des valeurs mobilières au cours des trois dernières années, la plupart des chefs de la direction de sociétés de courtage en valeurs mobilières s’attendent à d’autres regroupements dans le secteur, a déclaré Ian Russell, président et chef de la direction de l’Association canadienne des courtiers en valeurs mobilières (ACCVM) dont le siège social est à Toronto, lors du discours qu’il a prononcé à l’occasion du déjeuner causerie annuel sur les perspectives de l’investissement qui s’est tenu mardi à Toronto à l’Empire Club du Canada.

• « Ce point de vue pessimiste n’est guère surprenant alors qu’il y a encore plus de 50 sociétés de courtage en valeurs mobilières dont le chiffre d’affaires brut est de 5 M$ ou moins, ce qui suggère une échelle de production insuffisante pour faire face à la conjoncture actuelle », a déclaré M. Russell.

• Il y aura donc moins de sociétés, particulièrement dans les petites localités, et des pertes d’emplois – même si les grandes sociétés engageront les bons conseillers financiers qui se retrouveront sans emploi, a t il suggéré.


Advisor.ca
– 5 janvier 2016 –
Les chefs de file du secteur s’attendent à une aggravation du ralentissement économique, selon l’ACCVM (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Les chefs de file du secteur canadien des valeurs mobilières s’attendent à ce que la mauvaise conjoncture économique se poursuive en 2016 et que la hausse incessante des frais d’exploitation cause d’autres regroupements dans l’année qui vient.


Financial Post
– 18 décembre 2015 –
Lettre au père Noël : les sociétés de courtage indépendantes ont besoin d’un répit (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Pour les sociétés de courtage indépendantes, dont la plupart sont des sociétés fermées, qui font concurrence aux grandes banques chaque jour, le plus beau cadeau de Noël consisterait en une amélioration des marchés boursiers, une augmentation des cours des matières premières, un assouplissement de la réglementation – et davantage d’attention de la part des émetteurs.

• Si aucune de ces conditions n’est satisfaite en 2016, le secteur continuera sa glissade – tout cela inquiète les employés, les investisseurs, les émetteurs et les organismes de réglementation.

• Entre 2011 et juin 2015, le nombre de sociétés dans le secteur a baissé de 25, selon l’Association canadienne des courtiers en valeurs mobilières.


The Globe and Mail
– 18 décembre 2015 –
Manque pouvant atteindre 6,1 M$ dans les comptes des clients d’Octagon en faillite (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Plusieurs sociétés de courtage indépendantes ont connu des difficultés ces derniers temps en raison d’un marché des ressources naturelles anémique, d’un marché des actions en déconfiture et d’un bouleversement généralisé du modèle d’entreprise en matière de services bancaires d’investissement.

• Au cours des derniers trois ans et demi, plus de 50 sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières ont ou fermé leurs portes, ou ont fusionné ou ont été acquises.


investmentexecutive.com
– 17 décembre 2015 –
Le livre blanc de la Bourse de croissance TSX expose des mesures de relance (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• La bourse de croissance veut réduire les coûts des sociétés inscrites, stimuler la participation des investisseurs et augmenter et diversifier ses inscriptions.


The Globe and Mail
– 1er décembre 2015 –
1er décembre 2015 – Octagon Capital devient la dernière petite société de courtage à fermer ses portes (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Octagon est loin d’être la seule petite société de courtage indépendante qui a eu des difficultés récemment.

• Un marché des ressources naturelles anémique, un marché des actions en déconfiture et des changements généralisés à long terme dans les services bancaires d’investissement ont pesé lourdement sur plusieurs des petites sociétés sur Bay Street, certaines ayant été acquises par des concurrents de plus grande taille et d’autres ayant mis fin à toutes leurs activités commerciales.

• Selon des statistiques obtenues de l’Association canadienne des courtiers en valeurs mobilières, au cours des derniers 3 ½ ans, plus de 50 sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières ont ou fermé leurs portes, ou ont fusionné ou ont été acquises.


investmentexecutive.com
– 1er décembre 2015 –
Le Groupe TMX veut revigorer la Bourse de croissance TSX (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Même si le groupe n’a pas fait savoir quelle était sa stratégie, il a mentionné son intention de réorienter la bourse vers la technologie au détriment des ressources naturelles.

• L’effondrement du secteur du capital de risque au Canada préoccupe énormément le secteur des valeurs mobilières, particulièrement les petites sociétés de courtage qui ont été touchées durement par la baisse des activités de financement et des activités de négociation dans ce créneau du marché.

• Selon des statistiques publiées plus tôt cette année par l’Association canadienne des courtiers en valeurs mobilières (ACCVM), les financements des titres à faible capitalisation ont diminué d’environ 50 % depuis la crise financière et les activités de négociation de titres de capital de risque ont diminué d’environ un tiers.


Globeandmail.com
– 30 septembre 2015 –
Les petites sociétés de courtage sur Bay Street ne sont pas si mal en point (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Les temps sont difficiles pour les sociétés de courtages en valeurs mobilières indépendantes parce que les prix des matières premières se sont effondrés, mais elles devraient se consoler en se rappelant que cela a déjà été pire.

• Aussi pénible que le marché puisse être actuellement pour les banques spécialisées d’investissement, alors que la plupart des prises fermes et des services de consultation sont effectués par les sociétés de courtage détenues par les grandes banques, leur situation est loin d’être aussi mauvaise qu’elle l’était il y a trois ans.

• Même si les bénéfices sont beaucoup plus élevés que durant la débâcle des matières premières de 2012, cela ne veut pas dire que toutes les sociétés s’en tirent de la même façon. Par exemple, plus tôt cette année, Edgecrest Capital a fermé ses portes. Des entreprises renommées, comme Canaccord Genuity et FirstEnergy, ont procédé à des mises à pied.

• Alors que la débâcle des matières premières se poursuit, le Canada continue à perdre des sociétés de courtage indépendantes. Selon l’ACCVM, le secteur dans son ensemble a diminué de 11 % depuis 2012 et il ne reste plus que 174 sociétés.


investmentexecutive.com
– 28 août 2015 –
Valeurs Mobilières Beacon se départira de ses activités de détail la semaine prochaine (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• « Vous assistez en ce moment à la mise en œuvre par une société spécialisée d’un plan cohérent et bien conçu », a déclaré à Toronto Ian Russell, président et chef de la direction de l’Association canadienne des courtiers en valeurs mobilières.

• « C’est une chose d’offrir des services de détail très spécialisés. Cependant, dans le contexte actuel il faut que l’échelle et la taille de l’offre soient considérables. La plupart des clients recherchent un éventail beaucoup plus grand de produits et services. »


Financial Post
– 9 octobre 2014 –
Sans faire d’éclat, E.F. Hutton suspend ses projets d’ouvrir une société de courtage au Canada (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• La décision est survenue peu de temps après que l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières ait publié une mise à jour de la situation financière des participants au secteur.

• Le rapport de sept pages brossait un tableau sombre de la situation des sociétés spécialisées actuellement en exploitation malgré la reprise des deux dernières années.

• « Les sociétés spécialisées, malmenées par la faiblesse prolongée des marchés institutionnel et de détail et l’augmentation incessante des coûts technologiques et dépenses de conformité, ont accueilli avec satisfaction le redressement récent des bénéfices. Mais, on s’inquiète pour leur survie à long terme », peut-on lire dans le rapport écrit par Ian Russell, chef de la direction de l’ACCVM.

• Qu’en est-il de ces doutes? M. Russell a déclaré dans son rapport que si l’on se fie aux prévisions de l’ACCVM, les bénéfices d’exploitation des sociétés spécialisées « resteront bien inférieurs à ceux des années 2006 2007 malgré les bons résultats de cette année ».

• Ces prévisions sont conformes à l’évolution récente de la situation. M. Russell a souligné qu’au cours des deux dernières années, 23 sociétés spécialisées ont disparu par liquidations, fusions ou acquisitions. Les sociétés intégrées, dont un certain nombre est détenu par des banques « ont un avantage concurrentiel sur les marchés à cause de cela ».


Globeandmail.com
– 6 octobre 2014 –
Pourquoi les sociétés spécialisées ont-elles encore de la difficulté? (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Les sociétés spécialisées canadiennes de courtage en valeurs mobilières n’ont pas de répit. C’est la meilleure année depuis 2007 pour les honoraires générés par la négociation des actions et les activités d’acquisition. Cependant, plusieurs des petites banques d’investissement au pays ont encore de la difficulté à joindre les deux bouts.

• La situation est tellement sérieuse que l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières a suggéré récemment qu’entre 30 et 40 petites sociétés de courtage pourraient disparaître d’ici deux ans, soit en fermant leurs portes ou par une fusion.

• La persistance des difficultés s’explique par des raisons évidentes. Le volume de transactions dans des secteurs clés comme les mines est encore faible. Plusieurs des petites sociétés de courtage dépendent des activités de financement des entreprises du secteur des ressources naturelles qui sont inscrites à la Bourse de croissance TSX.

• Le chef de l’ACCVM, Ian Russell, a aussi déclaré au Globe and Mail que les coûts réglementaires ne cessent d’augmenter et que cela exerce une pression sur les petites sociétés de courtage qui sont déjà aux prises avec des produits d’exploitation incertains.


Finance et Investissement
– 25 septembre 2014 –
Le secteur des valeurs mobilières n’en a pas fini avec les fusions et acquisitions

Passages choisis :

• « Le rythme des regroupements de sociétés spécialisées (en valeurs mobilières) se poursuivra et même augmentera », selon le président et chef de la direction de l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières (ACCVM), Ian C. W. Russell.


Globeandmail.com
(subscription required) – 24 septembre 2014 –
Les sociétés spécialisées de courtage en valeurs mobilières ont encore de la difficulté même si les marchés se redressent (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Les participants au secteur canadien des valeurs mobilières qui sont solides deviennent encore plus solides parce que les grandes sociétés profitent davantage du redressement des marchés. Les sociétés qui restent en arrière continueront à disparaître.

• Les statistiques de l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières (ACCVM) indiquent que les bénéfices augmentent dans le secteur du courtage et des valeurs mobilières. Mais, c’est vraiment une affaire de bien nantis et de démunis.

• Ian Russell, président et chef de la direction de l’ACCVM, a déclaré : « Plus les sociétés spécialisées augmenteront leur taille et mieux elles se porteront. Nous aurons un secteur de sociétés spécialisées plus solide, mais plus petit ».


Financialpost.com
– 24 septembre 2014 –
Les sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières sont sorties de la crise financière, mais les sociétés spécialisées restent en arrière (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Les choses se présentent bien pour les sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières, avec les sociétés intégrées qui sont en voie de dépasser cette année, pour la deuxième année consécutive, les bénéfices réalisés avant la crise. Les rendements s’améliorent aussi pour les sociétés spécialisées, mais elles sont encore loin des résultats d’avant-crise, selon l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières.

• « Les sociétés spécialisées, malmenées par une conjoncture défavorable des marchés institutionnel et de détail et l’augmentation incessante des coûts technologiques et dépenses de conformité, ont accueilli avec satisfaction le redressement récent des bénéfices. Mais, on s’inquiète pour leur survie à long terme », a déclaré Ian Russell, chef de la direction de l’ACCVM, dans la lettre aux membres de l’association publiée mercredi.


investmentexecutive.com
– 24 septembre 2014 –
Les sociétés spécialisées ont encore de la difficulté (en anglais)

• La performance du secteur des valeurs mobilières s’est améliorée. Cependant, les perspectives restent incertaines pour les petites sociétés.

• On prévoit que les bénéfices d’exploitation du secteur canadien du courtage augmenteront de plus de 30 % cette année, mais plusieurs sociétés spécialisées ont encore de la difficulté, selon l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières (ACCVM).

• L’ACCVM a fait des recommandations tant aux boutiques spécialisées qu’aux organismes de réglementation pour renforcer le créneau des sociétés spécialisées.


Advisor.ca
– 24 septembre 2014 –
Salman Partners acquiert Woodstone Capital (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Les sociétés spécialisées devraient acheter les sociétés intégrées qui leur font concurrence ou attirer les clients de concurrents indépendants, écrit Ian Russell, président et chef de la direction de l’ACCVM.

• Les suggestions font partie de la liste de recommandations pour renforcer le secteur des boutiques de courtage spécialisées en valeurs mobilières publiée par l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières dans un numéro de la Lettre du président.


investmentexecutive.com
– 23 septembre 2014 –
Tempest Capital démissionnera de l’OCRCVM (en anglais)

• L’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières (ACCVM) a averti que les entreprises à faible capitalisation en général et les entreprises du secteur des ressources naturelles en particulier sont aux prises avec une insuffisance de fonds propres qui s’aggrave; et qu’une telle situation nuit aux sociétés de courtage qui sont très présentes dans ce créneau du marché.

• L’ACCVM a mainte fois demandé au gouvernement fédéral d’aider les entreprises en démarrage à se financer en adoptant des mesures fiscales ciblées.


Globeandmail.com
 (subscription required) – 29 juillet 2014 – 
Salman Partners acquiert Woodstone Capital (en anglais)

Passages choisis : 

• Deux courtiers-contrepartistes indépendants en difficulté ont fusionné, conjuguant leurs efforts pour faire concurrence aux grandes sociétés dans le difficile marché des sociétés spécialisées.

• Le chef de l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières a déclaré en janvier que les sociétés spécialisées sont aux prises avec une crise « existentielle ». Salman Partners ne fait pas exception à la règle. Plusieurs cadres supérieurs ont démissionné au cours de la dernière année alors que les produits d’exploitation ont diminué dans tous les segments du secteur.


Globeandmail.com
 (subscription required) – 7 fevrier 2014 – Chez Jennings, une société spécialisée est restructurée pour s’adapter au temps présent (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Il est bien connu que des essais de petites sociétés spécialisées dans les ressources naturelles ont déjà eu lieu.

• Le chef de l’association professionnelle des sociétés de courtage en valeurs mobilières a récemment déclaré que les sociétés qui exercent des activités dans le même créneau que Jennings livraient un combat pour la « survie ». Des concurrents de Jennings ont déjà fermé leurs portes.


Business in Vancouver
 – 28 janvier 2014 –  Le fardeau réglementaire coule le marché à petite capitalisation; il faut renforcer la mise en application de la réglementation déjà en vigueur au lieu d’adopter de nouvelles règles, déclarent des sociétés de courtage (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• Selon les statistiques de l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières (ACCVM), les sociétés canadiennes de courtage de détail en valeurs mobilières continuent à perdre de l’argent.


Financial Post
 – 27 janvier 2014 – Les sociétés spécialisées de courtage en valeurs mobilières du Canada luttent pour leur survie (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Depuis quelques années, l’ACCVM et d’autres observateurs du secteur avertissent que la situation de plusieurs petites sociétés canadiennes est précaire et que plusieurs d’entre elles pourraient disparaître s’il n’y a pas une reprise importante des activités de prise ferme et de négociation des titres à petite capitalisation.

• Dans un rapport publié la semaine dernière, l’ACCVM a décrit le fossé qui sépare les grandes des petites sociétés comme « l’abondance ou la famine ».


Wall Street Journal
 – 27 janvier 2014 – Les petites banques d’investissement du Canada ont de la difficulté, ce qui favorise les regroupements (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• Au cours des cinq dernières années, les bénéfices des 58 petites banques d’investissement institutionnelles canadiennes ont chuté de 67 % alors que plusieurs investisseurs ont cherché à se protéger de la volatilité du marché en achetant des titres à grande capitalisation et des instruments à rendement, selon une association du secteur, l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières.


Globeandmail.com
 (subscription required) – 27 janvier 2014 – Edgecrest acquiert Stonecap et ajoutera 10 employés à l’équipe spécialisée (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• Plusieurs sociétés spécialisées luttent pour leur survie après une troisième année consécutive de baisse de bénéfices. Le chef de l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières (ACCVM) a déclaré que le secteur est aux prises avec une crise « existentielle ».


Wall Street Journal
 (subscription required) – 27 janvier 2014 – Edgecrest Capital du Canada achètera Stonecap Securities; la transaction intervient alors que les petites sociétés de courtage canadiennes subissent une pression de plus en plus grande pour se regrouper (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Les grandes sociétés de courtage intégrées canadiennes, dont la plupart sont détenues par les grandes banques du pays, ont augmenté en moyenne leurs bénéfices d’exploitation de 43 % au cours des cinq dernières années.

• Cependant, pour les 58 petites banques d’investissement institutionnelles canadiennes, les bénéfices ont chuté de 67 % durant ce temps alors que plusieurs investisseurs ont cherché à se protéger de la volatilité du marché en achetant des titres à grande capitalisation et des instruments à rendement, selon une association du secteur, l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières.


Bloomberg
 – 27 janvier 2014 – Edgecrest achète Stonecap pour étendre ses services bancaires dans les secteurs des mines et de l’énergie (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• Les sociétés spécialisées canadiennes de courtage en valeurs mobilières s’enfoncent dans le marasme alors qu’une conjoncture commerciale difficile, l’ajout de règlements, et l’augmentation de la concurrence diminuent les bénéfices, selon un communiqué du 23 janvier de l’ACCVM.

Financial Post – 23 janvier 2014 – « L’abondance ou la famine » pour les sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières, selon l’ACCVM (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

•Cependant, les quelque 180 sociétés spécialisées du Canada restent « aux prises avec la persistance d’une conjoncture commerciale difficile et de faibles bénéfices » et aussi avec « une concurrence féroce et un lourd fardeau réglementaire qui ne cesse de s’accroître », a déclaré Ian Russell, président de l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières, dans une lettre aux membres.


Globeandmail.com
 (subscribers only) – 23 janvier 2014 –  Les petites sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières sont aux prises avec une crise « existentielle » (en anglais)

Passage choisi : 

• Les petites sociétés de courtage du Canada luttent pour leur survie après une troisième année consécutive de baisse de bénéfices, déclare le chef de l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières (ACCVM).


Investment Executive
 – 23 janvier 2014 –  Les sociétés de courtage spécialisées sont encore en difficulté, selon l’ACCVM; les bénéfices de l’ensemble du secteur ont augmenté de 27 % en 2013 (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• On estime que les bénéfices d’exploitation du secteur canadien des valeurs mobilières ont atteint 4,8 G$ l’année dernière, une hausse d’environ 27 % par rapport à 2012. Cependant, les grandes sociétés intégrées ont accaparé la majeure partie de ces bénéfices. Les sociétés spécialisées du secteur ont encore de la difficulté à joindre les deux bouts.


Advisor.ca
 – 23 janvier 2014 –  Les grandes sociétés brillent alors que les sociétés spécialisées souffrent, selon l’ACCVM (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• Voici des faits saillants de la lettre :

  1. 1. Les bénéfices d’exploitation des sociétés intégrées ont augmenté en moyenne de 43 % au cours des cinq dernières années en réalisant des gains constants la plupart du temps.
  2. 2. Les bénéfices d’exploitation du secteur du détail ont baissé de 39 % durant la même période. La majeure partie de la baisse résulte des pertes importantes réalisées en 2012.
  3. 3. Les causes de l’effondrement des bénéfices des sociétés spécialisées comprennent : une conjoncture défavorable des marchés; des investisseurs méfiants; les pratiques abusives de négociation algorithmique; les coûts de conformité du fardeau réglementaire qui ne cesse de s’alourdir; et l’augmentation des coûts en matière de technologie et systèmes pour exécuter les ordres et réaliser la compensation et le règlement.


Canadianinvestor.com
 – 19 novembre 2013 –   Les sociétés de courtage indépendantes sont prises à la gorge (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• • Le secteur canadien des valeurs mobilières est en régression. Les regroupements – rendus nécessaires par l’excès de réglementation et la hausse des frais d’exploitation – prennent à la gorge particulièrement les petites sociétés de courtage parce que leurs marges sont plus serrées. La conséquence est une diminution des choix offerts aux investisseurs et entrepreneurs canadiens à la recherche de financement.

• En 2012, les frais d’exploitation pour chaque dollar du chiffre d’affaires ont bondi à 61 % pour les sociétés de courtage indépendantes alors qu’ils étaient de 18 % pour les sociétés intégrées. Et le groupe des petites sociétés dont les produits d’exploitation proviennent surtout des services conseils offerts aux clients de détail ont perdu 99 M$ l’an passé. Les estimations réalisées par l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières (ACCVM) suggèrent qu’environ 30 sociétés de courtage de petite et moyenne tailles ont disparu au cours des quatre années qui ont suivi la crise financière.


Canadianinvestor.com
 – 18 novembre 2013 – L’excès de réglementation est-il en train d’écraser les sociétés de courtage? (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Selon les estimations réalisées par l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières (ACCVM), environ 30 sociétés de courtage de petite et moyenne tailles ont disparu au cours des années qui ont suivi la crise financière de 2008. Et un certain nombre de sociétés ont démissionné de l’organisme d’autoréglementation du secteur. Au cours des dernières années, il y en avait environ 10 par année. En 2013, il y en a eu 11 au premier trimestre.

• Si les sociétés indépendantes continuent à disparaître, les entrepreneurs canadiens qui veulent créer des petites et moyennes entreprises auront plus de difficulté à se financer. C’est particulièrement le cas des petites sociétés minières en Colombie Britannique qui traditionnellement se fiaient aux sociétés de courtage indépendantes pour se financer.


Vancouver Sun
 – 27 octobre 2013 – Opinion : la paperasserie plombe les possibilités d’exploitation des ressources naturelles de la Colombie Britannique; coûts de conformité : l’augmentation du fardeau réglementaire conduit inutilement le secteur vers un avenir peu prometteur (en anglais)

• Selon l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières, pour les services offerts par les sociétés spécialisées en 2012, les frais d’exploitation pour chaque dollar du chiffre d’affaires étaient de 61 cents après avoir grimpé de plus de 60 % au cours des quelques dernières années. À titre de comparaison, les grandes banques, qui exercent des activités commerciales plus rentables et plus diversifiées, ont vu leurs frais d’exploitation globaux pour chaque dollar du chiffre d’affaires monter de 18 % pour s’établir à 41 cents.

• Cette tendance sonne le glas du courtage indépendant qui historiquement a aidé les quelques 800 et plus petites sociétés minières de la Colombie Britannique. La perte des sociétés de courtage indépendantes qui ont acquis une expertise considérable en matière de gestion et qui ont mis en place une infrastructure opérationnelle efficace pour conseiller les investisseurs institutionnels et de détail portera un dur coup aux investisseurs, économies régionales et marchés de capital de risque. Si les sociétés indépendantes continuent à fermer leurs portes, il y aura moins de sources de financement à la portée des entrepreneurs canadiens qui veulent créer de petites ou moyennes entreprises.


Wealth Professional 
– 10 septembre 2013 –   Les regroupements continuent alors que Richardson GMP achète Macquarie Canada (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• Citation d’Ian Russell, président et chef de la direction de l’ACCVM : « Ce sont deux sociétés dynamiques de taille moyenne qui font affaire sur le marché du détail. Elles assurent une saine concurrence sur le marché et elles offrent aux consommateurs une large gamme de produits et services à des prix compétitifs. Lorsqu’une de ces sociétés disparaît, ce n’est donc pas bon pour le marché ».


The Globe and Mail 
– 9 septembre 2013 –  Richardson GMP achète la filiale canadienne en gestion de patrimoine de Macquarie (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• L’acquisition survient alors que les sociétés de courtage de détail indépendantes concurrencent les grandes banques canadiennes pour attirer les clients. Les statistiques de l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières suggèrent que les petites sociétés, dont la principale source de produits d’exploitation provient des services-conseils offerts aux investisseurs de détail, ont perdu en tout 99 M$ l’année dernière.


Advisor.ca 
– 9 septembre 2013 – Richardson GMP achète Gestion privée Macquarie

Passage choisi :

• Depuis les années 2007-2008, les produits d’exploitation des sociétés spécialisées ont chuté du tiers environ, ou 1,7 G$, selon un rapport de l’ACCVM publié en mars 2013. La plus grande partie de la baisse est survenue au cours des deux dernières années. « C’est la viabilité des petites sociétés spécialisées qui est menacée, à moins d’un redressement du marché à court terme », a écrit Ian Russell, chef de la direction.


Advisor.ca
 – 4 septembre 2013 – Que se passe-t-il avec les sociétés spécialisées? (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• Un rapport de mars 2013 publié par l’ACCVM dresse un sombre tableau. « Toutes les sociétés sont aux prises avec une faiblesse des marchés boursiers, cependant l’impact se fait plus gravement sentir sur les sociétés spécialisées. C’est la viabilité des petites sociétés spécialisées qui est menacée, à moins d’un redressement du marché à court terme », a écrit Ian Russell, chef de la direction, dans une lettre aux membres.


Advisor.ca 
– 26 août 2013 – 6 moyens à la disposition des organismes de réglementation pour stimuler le secteur financier, selon l’ACCVM (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Les professionnels de la finance croyaient probablement que leurs registres et résultats ne pourraient pas être pires que ceux qui ont suivi la récession, déclare dans une lettre récente Ian Russell, président et chef de la direction de l’ACCVM.

• Cependant, en 2013, les « produits et bénéfices d’exploitation […] des sociétés spécialisées institutionnelles canadiennes [en services-conseils] ont chuté à leur deuxième plus bas résultat trimestriel à cause de la diminution des activités boursières des services bancaires d’investissement et des activités de négociation boursière ».


Calgary Herald 
– 23 août 2013 – Les retards du projet de pipeline causent des pertes d’emploi dans les services bancaires d’investissement (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• M. Russell [président et chef de la direction de l’ACCVM] a déclaré que son association estime qu’environ la moitié aux deux tiers des petites sociétés spécialisées canadiennes de courtage en valeurs mobilières perdent de l’argent à cause de la mauvaise conjoncture actuelle. Plusieurs doivent choisir entre fermer leurs portes ou continuer à gruger leurs fonds propres en attendant une reprise des activités.


Globeandmail.com 
(réservé aux abonnés) – 22 août 2013 – Lettre de l’ACCVM : pourquoi la disparition des petites sociétés de courtage est-elle si importante? (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• Ian Russell, chef de l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières, demande aux organismes de réglementation du secteur des valeurs mobilières d’adopter des changements pour réduire la pression sur les petites sociétés qui sont aux prises avec un environnement opérationnel difficile causé par la faiblesse des marchés des ressources naturelles et une diminution des inscriptions et qui ne peuvent pas compter sur des économies d’échelle. M. Russell souligne qu’il sera difficile de remplacer ces sociétés de courtage à cause de l’introduction de plusieurs barrières à l’entrée au cours des quelques dernières années.


The Globe and Mail 
– 22 août 2013 – Le ralentissement dans le secteur minier commence à se faire sentir alors que Bay Street perd des emplois et des sociétés (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• « Si d’autres petites sociétés de courtage […] continuent à fermer leurs portes, les marchés des capitaux au Canada subiront des conséquences graves, tant sur le plan de la réduction du stimulus de la concurrence sur les marchés institutionnels et de détail que celui de la diminution des possibilités de financement des petites entreprises canadiennes », a déclaré le chef de l’ACCVM, Ian Russell, dans une lettre au secteur du courtage.


Bloomberg 
– 22 août 2013 – Stifel a déclaré planifier la fermeture de ses succursales canadiennes et le licenciement d’environ 70 employés (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• Le nombre d’employés au service de sociétés de courtage en valeurs mobilières au Canada a baissé au premier trimestre pour atteindre son plus bas niveau depuis 2006, selon l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières.


St. Louis Business Journal 
– 22 août 2013 – Stifel met fin à ses activités au Canada (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• L’agence de presse a rapporté qu’au premier trimestre, le nombre d’employés au service des sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières était à son plus bas niveau depuis 2006, selon l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières. Les sociétés financières qui perçoivent des honoraires sur la vente d’actions sont sous pression à cause du ralentissement dans le secteur minier canadien.


Investment Executive 
– 6 août 2013 – L’ACCVM demande à Ottawa d’encourager les petites entreprises à réaliser des investissements et d’aider les petites sociétés de courtage (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• L’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières (ACCVM) indique que le gouvernement doit prendre des mesures pour stimuler la productivité et l’achat d’actions, ce qui améliorera aussi le sort précaire des petites sociétés de courtage canadiennes.


The Globe and Mail 
– 27 juillet 2013 – Comment les six grandes banques ont-elles gagné la bataille pour la gestion du patrimoine des Canadiens? (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• Les petites sociétés dont la principale source de produits d’exploitation provient des services conseils offerts aux investisseurs de détail ont perdu en tout 99 M$ l’année dernière, selon l’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières.


Bloomberg 
– 25 juillet 2013 – Les banquiers de Toronto ressentent les conséquences du ralentissement du secteur minier, selon un regroupement d’entreprises canadiennes (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• « Le nombre d’employés au service des sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières a baissé au premier trimestre pour atteindre son plus bas niveau depuis 2006 », selon les statistiques de l’ACCVM. Ian Russell a déclaré en avril que « plus du tiers des 185 sociétés spécialisées canadiennes ont perdu de l’argent au cours des deux dernières années ».

• « Vous venez d’assister à un effondrement complet de la croissance, du développement de projets [et] des activités de mobilisation des capitaux », a déclaré M Russell.


Bloomberg 
– 4 juillet 2013 – Le nombre de sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières est à son plus bas niveau depuis 7 ans (en anglais)

Passage choisi :

• « Le secteur a connu une période de faiblesse prolongée, et les sociétés se sont alors repliées ou elles se restructurent actuellement. Cette tendance se poursuivra probablement pour une bonne partie du reste de l’année », a déclaré aujourd’hui Ian Russell, chef de la direction de l’association, lors d’un entretien téléphonique.”


Financial Post 
– 4 juillet 2013 – ACCVM : un premier trimestre difficile pour les sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières (en anglais)

Passages choisis :

• Secouées par des marchés volatils et une économie fragile, les sociétés de courtage canadiennes en valeurs mobilières ont encore eu de la difficulté au premier trimestre de 2013.

• L’Association canadienne du commerce des valeurs mobilières a déclaré que les bénéfices globaux de ses membres au premier trimestre se chiffraient à 515 M$, une baisse de presque 14 % par rapport au trimestre précédent et de 26,5 % par rapport au même trimestre de l’exercice précédent.